Mountain Home Music

Mountain Home Music • The Mast Farm Inn is honored to be one of the sponsors of Mountain Home Music. The mission of Mountain Home Music is to preserve and honor the music of the Appalachian region.

Mountain Home MusicThe Mast Farm Inn is honored to be one of the official sponsors of Mountain Home Music. The mission of Mountain Home Music is to preserve and honor the music of the Appalachian region. Mountain Home Music has produced over 200 concerts since it began in 1994. Performers have included three National Folk-life Award winners, seven North Carolina Folk Heritage Award winners, and over 1000 local and regional performers. Thirty-seven shows have been broadcast on educational television in Watauga County and in Winston-Salem, fourteen on local AM radio, and twenty on WETS public radio of Johnson City, Tennessee. By becoming a member of Mountain Home Music, you are contributing to preserving the traditions rooted in these Appalachian Mountains.


The Mountain Home Music season runs from mid-May to early December. For information about concerts and to order tickets visit www.mountainhomemusic.com. Until then we hope you enjoy this Bluegrass Roads video featuring North Carolina’s Darin & Brooke Aldridge appearing October 20th, 2012 at Mountain Home Music


Joe Shannon is a musician and the founder and executive director of Mountainhome Music, which honors the musicians, dancers, storytellers, and poets of the Appalachian region. This organization has produced over 127 concerts, 34 of which have aired on regional educational television and 45 of which have aired on public radio. He lives in Boone, North Carolina.Joe Shannon is a teacher and performing artist. He is also founder of MOUNTAIN HOME MUSIC, a concert series and radio show dedicated to honoring the music and musicians of the Appalachian region.
History of Mountain Home Music by Joe Shannon, Founder & Executive Director •
"I moved to Boone in 1977 and as soon as I arrived I started looking for folks who shared my love for traditional music. I found many–Cecil Gurganus, a neighbor who played fiddle, Steve Lewis, who played guitar and banjo, Mary Greene, who played just about everything and also loved to sing old ballads and hymns. And I met many more great musicians.

The Forget-Me-Nots bring fresh energy to the ageless tradition of Celtic music. The band originated in 2002 but its roots go back to 1999, when the girls started playing violin at the tender ages of 2, 3 and 4 years old. The players are Willa Finck, Maura Shawn Scanlin, and Ledah Finck, with David Finck on backup guitar. The girls, classically trained through the Suzuki method, also showed an early interest in playing old-time and Celtic fiddle music. This interest blossomed in the fertile grounds of the North Carolina High Country, an area steeped in Appalachian musical traditions.The Forget-Me-Nots bring fresh energy to the ageless tradition of Celtic music. The band originated in 2002 but its roots go back to 1999, when the girls started playing violin at the tender ages of 2, 3 and 4 years old. The players are Willa Finck, Maura Shawn Scanlin, and Ledah Finck, with David Finck on backup guitar. The girls, classically trained through the Suzuki method, also showed an early interest in playing old-time and Celtic fiddle music. This interest blossomed in the fertile grounds of the North Carolina High Country, an area steeped in Appalachian musical traditions.
Mostly we would play at somebody’s house, or barn, or church. There also were occasional festivals and weddings where some combination of local musicians would gather. Fortunate to be invited to many places, over the years I met a wide variety of traditional performer–musicians, dancers, storytellers and poets.

I met so many incredible performers, but except for the one or two big fiddle festivals each year, there was no ongoing event or place where locals and visitors to the High Country could experience this talent. It was my belief that once folks saw or heard these local, and relatively unknown performers, they would respect their talent and also feel an authentic connection to Appalachian culture.

Without the loyal support of our members, Mountain Home Music would not exist, and we are grateful to everyone who contributes to helping Mountain Home Music accomplish its mission.© Lonnie Webster 2012 • www.lonniewebster.com
I decided to test my belief. On February 4, 1994 Music in the Mountains was started.

The first concert featured Steve Lewis, Rachel Nelson, Becca Eggers-Gryder, and myself. The location was Our Daily Bread, a small delicatessen in downtown Boone. Crowds were small at first, but soon started to grow and after several months we outgrew Our Daily Bread. Summer and fall programs in 1994 were moved to the Student Union on the ASU campus. "Community folks" were hesitant to venture to the ASU Student Union, and in 1995 concerts were moved to the Boone United Methodist Church.


Because Boone United Methodist Church and other churches often have weddings on Saturday evenings, this necessitated us moving around some more. In subsequent years, other locations have included the Broyhill Inn & Conference Center, the Wesley Foundation, Watauga High School Auditorium, Appalachian Brian Estates, the First Baptist Church, and Grace Lutheran Church.

Name changes came too. In 1996, I discovered that Music in the Mountains was a registered name by another organization, so I changed the name to Old Time Music in the Mountains. After another year, I decided this was too long so in 1997 I changed the name, again, to Mountain Home Music.

Without the loyal support of our members, Mountain Home Music would not exist, and we are grateful to everyone who contributes to helping Mountain Home Music accomplish its mission.© Lonnie Webster 2012 • www.lonniewebster.com
We have continued to use different venues in the community, but for the past three years we seem to be settling into Saint Luke’s Episcopal Church and ASU’s Valborg Theatre for Spring/Summer concerts and the Blowing Rock Auditorium for Fall programs.

Consistent with the reason I started Mountain Home Music, our purpose is to honor the musicians, dancers, storytellers, and poets of the Appalachian region. In the Winter of 2001, I thought of another way to say this: "We present world-class Appalachian performers that you’ve probably never heard of."

The April Verch Band • April Verch, doesn’t just perform music, she exudes it.  The internationally renowned  Canadian fiddler, singer, songwriter and stepdancer has a passion for performing and her goal is to touch the lives of those who are listening and watching. The April Verch Band • April Verch, doesn’t just perform music, she exudes it.  The internationally renowned  Canadian fiddler, singer, songwriter and stepdancer has a passion for performing and her goal is to touch the lives of those who are listening and watching.
As of September 2002, Mountain Home Music has produced one hundred and twenty-seven concerts, thirty-seven of which have aired on regional educational television and forty-five have aired on public radio. And over five hundred different performers from the Appalachian region have appeared on the Mountain Home Music stage.

In September, 2002, a group of interested individuals got together with Joe to discuss converting Mountain Home Music into a non-profit organization so grants could be applied for and memberships could be solicited. Since Mountain Home Music had not made a profit in eight years of existence, that seemed a reasonable approach.

Without the loyal support of our members, Mountain Home Music would not exist, and we are grateful to everyone who contributes to helping Mountain Home Music accomplish its mission.Red June is an acoustic power trio from Asheville, NC, performing beautifully distilled Americana music that literally drips with soul. The Red June sound is as versatile and original as the musicians themselves; they touch on bluegrass, roots rock, and traditional country music with powerful harmonies, honest, heartfelt songwriting, and top shelf musicianship.
A mission statement was developed: The mission of Mountain Home Music is to celebrate diverse styles of Appalachian performing arts. Mountain Home Music strives to educate and build community through the arts, providing accessible cross-generational experiences.
Red June is an acoustic trio from Asheville, NC performing beautifully distilled original Americana music. They are making waves with their dynamic, yet refined sound that features striking 3-part harmonies, tasteful instrumental work, and honest, soulful songwriting that seamlessly blends old-time, bluegrass, roots rock, and traditional country music. Red June has been capturing the hearts of audiences across the country and has performed at the renowned Music City Roots live radio show in Nashville, TN as well as Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion, Shakori Hills Grassroots Festival, Suwannee Springfest and the 25th anniversary MerleFest.

In November, 2002, the Articles of Incorporation were written for non-profit status. Mountain Home Music applied to the state of North Carolina to convert the corporation to non-profit and was approved in December, 2002. In January, 2003, Mountain Home Music applied for non-profit status with the IRS. In May, we finally received a letter from the IRS requesting additional information. That was submitted May 28, 2003.

Without the loyal support of our members, Mountain Home Music would not exist, and we are grateful to everyone who contributes to helping Mountain Home Music accomplish its mission.John Hartford once said that Mike Compton knows more about Bill Monroe style mandolin than the Father of Bluegrass himself.
Mountain Home Music was awarded 501(c)3 non-profit status on June 5, 2003. The Helen M. Clabough Charitable Foundation awarded a grant for $8,617 to Mountain Home Music, Inc. to purchase sound and recording equipment. Trustees for the Clabough Charitable Foundation presented the award to the Executive Director, Joe Shannon, and the Mountain Home Music Board of Directors at the Annual Christmas Concert–An Appalachian Christmas–on Saturday, November 29,2003.

The sound and recording equipment that this grant enabled Mountain Home Music to purchase has not only improved the sound quality for every concert, but it has also enabled capturing the audio sound track from every show. This will preserve every concert in the future on CD for archiving as well as to provide a source of income by copying the CDs and making them available for purchase by radio stations, members, or other interested persons."

Without the loyal support of our members, Mountain Home Music would not exist, and we are grateful to everyone who contributes to helping Mountain Home Music accomplish its mission.Without the loyal support of our members, Mountain Home Music would not exist, and we are grateful to everyone who contributes to helping Mountain Home Music accomplish its mission.
For More Information
Membershipwww.mountainhomemusic.com/membership
FaceBookwww.facebook.com/mountainhomemusic
WebSitewww.mountainhomemusic.com
Twitterwww.twitter.com/appalachiamusic
Sponsorswww.mountainhomemusic.com/sponsors
Source & Photo Credits www.mountainhomemusic.com, www.lonniewebster.com
This video was shot on the back porch of "The Granary" at the Mast Farm Inn.  We were entertaining the songwriting workshop participants and their instructors, Bluegrass luminaries Dan Tyminski and Ronnie Bowman.  You are hearing the last bit of a medley called "Tune for June" from our recently released CD called "blooming."

The Mast Farm Inn, Historic North Carolina Country Inn & Restaurant, Valle Crucis, NC

















































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