Caroline’s Apple Pear Upside Down

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Caroline’s Apple Pear Upside Down • Apple, Pear, and Walnut Butter Crust Cake. A picnic at the orchard. Fresh, Satisfying, Simple & Memorable. Like a cherished memory suspended in time. Blue jeans, butter, vanilla, crunchy walnuts, crispy apples and soothing pears, remind us that down to earth can be as glorious as tuxedos at the opera.


Ingredients & Shopping List
– 2 sticks of salted butter, softened
– 2 cups of sugar
– 2 eggs
– 2 cups of flour
– 2 teaspoons of vanilla extract
– ¾ cup of roasted walnuts
– 1 large apple (preferably Granny Smith)
– 1 large pear (preferably Anjou)


Instructions & Process
• Preheat the oven to 375 degrees
• Use 2 tablespoons of the butter to lightly butter the bottom of a rectangular pan, cut a parchment paper the size of the bottom of the pan, and place on bottom, then butter top of the parchment paper, and the sides of the pan.
• In a mixer, put the rest of the butter, add the sugar and mix both ingredients to a creamy consistency.
• Add the eggs one at a time and continue mixing, then lower the speed and add 1 cup of flour.
• Then add 1 teaspoon of the vanilla, the rest of the flour, mix and then add the second teaspoon of vanilla, and the roasted walnuts. Reserve.
• In the meantime, peel and core the apple and pear. Then slice the apple and pear using a vegetable peeler. Fan slices one on top of the other making a design on the bottom of the pan.
• Top the apple and pear slices with the batter, first by spooning it on, then by spreading it gently using a knife dipped in cold water, so as not to disrupt the fruit layer.
• Place in the oven for 45 to 50 minutes.
• Let rest for 5 minutes and unmold.

What To Be Careful Of
The pan must be well buttered before using. Sliced the apple and pear right before cooking.

Recommended Accompaniments
Caroline’s Coffee & Caramel • Front Porch’s Coffee ice cream, brownies and caramel all mixed together into one delectable dessert! Sounds like the ingredients for a proper Southern afternoon get together on the front porch. 

Peach ‘Shine Jam, Moonshine & Vanilla Bean • A distinct Southern Appalachian tradition, moonshine, has been distilled in the mountains of Western Carolina since the early 1800’s. What better way to “Preserve Tradition” than to combine this true mountain Spirit with locally grown peaches to create our Peach ‘Shine Jam

Recommended Beverages
Over Yonder’s Apple Butter TiniJunior Johnson’s Midnight Moon Apple Pie, Butterscotch Schnapps, Cinnamon Whiskey & Cream

Carriage House Apple Brandy • After about a year of Monday afternoon meetings around a table at a local restaurant, Keith Nordan and Chris Hollifield decided to open up Carolina Distillery. The first building the distillery was located in was an old carriage house in downtown Lenoir. That is where the apple brandy got it’s name  "Carriage House Apple Brandy".

ClearCreek Poire Williams Pear-in-the-Bottle • Poire Williams is the name for eau de vie made from the Williams pear, known as the Bartlett pear in the United States and Canada. It is generally served chilled as an after-dinner drink. Some producers of Poire Williams include an entire pear inside each bottle. This is achieved by attaching the bottle to a budding pear tree so that the pear will grow inside it.

Recommended Supplier
The Orchard at Altapass • When you choose to pick the in-season apples, you can go out to the orchard to see the different types of apples and even give them a taste before you choose! You may purchase apples by picking them yourself or the ones already packaged in the store.

Apple Hill Orchard • Nestled in South Mountains of Western North Carolina, our family has been growing apples in this location since 1955 and our apple growing roots go back five generations.  Apple Hill Orchard grows a wide variety of apples to suit everyone’s taste.


History •
John Chapman, often called Johnny Appleseed, was an American pioneer nurseryman who introduced apple trees to large parts of Pennsylvania, Ontario, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, as well as the northern counties of present-day West Virginia. He became an American legend while still alive, due to his kind, generous ways, his leadership in conservation, and the symbolic importance he attributed to apples. The popular image is of Johnny Appleseed spreading apple seeds randomly, everywhere he went. In fact, he planted nurseries rather than orchards, built fences around them to protect them from livestock, left the nurseries in the care of a neighbor who sold trees on shares, and returned every year or two to tend the nursery. Applejack is a strong alcoholic beverage produced from apples, popular in the American colonial period. Hard apple cider was an important drink in the colonial and early years of the United States, particularly in areas without access to clean water, but was often considered insufficiently palatable and bulky to store. Rather than consume an alcoholic fruit beer, the cider harvested in the fall was often separated in the winter via freeze distillation, by leaving it outside and periodically removing the frozen chunks of ice, thus concentrating the unfrozen alcohol in the remaining liquid. From the fermented juice, with an alcohol content of less than 10%, the concentrated result contains 30-40% alcohol.


For More Information
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Stay in Touch • www.themastfarminn.com/stay-in-touch
The Mast Farm Inn is an award-winning historic country inn & restaurant in the Valle Crucis Historical District of North Carolina, which has been welcoming guests since the 1800s. The Mast Farm Inn is a Historic Hotels of America hotel, a Select Registry Inn, and is on The National Register of Historic Places.

The Mast Farm Inn, Historic North Carolina Country Inn & Restaurant, Valle Crucis, NC